Media in Cooperation and Transition
Brunnenstraße 9, 10119 Berlin, Germany
mict-international.org

Our other projects
afghanistan-today.org
niqash.org
correspondents.org
عربي

Living with guns

Esther Muwombi
The most normal thing — guns in South Sudan.
23.02.2015  |  Kampala

 

I got my first gun from my uncle. I was back from Uganda after the war had ended. He called me before we went to bed and said ‘my son, you have come to a dangerous country you must have this gun but make sure you use it well’.”
            
Bongiri Jhon 
My gun was given to me by a friend. It is too easy to get one in Western Equatoria. I was orphaned as a child and had to hustle. I ended up as a shop keeper at a landing site at the border of Uganda and Tanzania, some 15 hours from my home town Mbale. The shop owner was a food supplier for the rebels and one day they forcefully whisked me off to go and train as a rebel and that’s how I got hold of a gun. Luckily I ran away from them after a few months.”
Steven Wanyera, a Ugandan
Both Dad and Mum own guns. Dad is a solider but my Mum isn’t but she owns a gun which I guess she got from Dad. When they disagree they both pull out their guns and the last time I saw them fight Dad shot at Mum but missed.”
Kenneth Manyang, a student at Juba University 
You can’t convince me that I shouldn’t own a gun. And now that there has been fighting again while we were enjoying peace we can’t trust the government at all. If it happened just two years after independence, how can you tell it won’t happen again?” 
Sayid Mohamed, a parent of 5.
If we all own guns there is no need for us to have an army or police services because everyone is their own security.” 
Sarah Keji, a worker at CPOC an oil company in Juba

I got my first gun from my uncle. I was back from Uganda after the war had ended. He called me before we went to bed and said ‘my son, you have come to a dangerous country you must have this gun but make sure you use it well’.”            
Bongiri Jhon 

My gun was given to me by a friend. It is too easy to get one in Western Equatoria. I was orphaned as a child and had to hustle. I ended up as a shop keeper at a landing site at the border of Uganda and Tanzania, some 15 hours from my home town Mbale. The shop owner was a food supplier for the rebels and one day they forcefully whisked me off to go and train as a rebel and that’s how I got hold of a gun. Luckily I ran away from them after a few months.”
Steven Wanyera, a Ugandan

Both Dad and Mum own guns. Dad is a solider but my Mum isn’t but she owns a gun which I guess she got from Dad. When they disagree they both pull out their guns and the last time I saw them fight Dad shot at Mum but missed.”
Kenneth Manyang, a student at Juba University 

You can’t convince me that I shouldn’t own a gun. And now that there has been fighting again while we were enjoying peace we can’t trust the government at all. If it happened just two years after independence, how can you tell it won’t happen again?” 
Sayid Mohamed, a parent of 5.

If we all own guns there is no need for us to have an army or police services because everyone is their own security.” 
Sarah Keji, a worker at CPOC an oil company in Juba