Media in Cooperation and Transition
Brunnenstraße 9, 10119 Berlin, Germany
mict-international.org

Our other projects
afghanistan-today.org
niqash.org
correspondents.org
عربي

MSF leaves capital of oil-producing state after looting, locals lack doctors

Esther Muwombi
Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), the only aid organisation left in Malakal, said it has evacuated its doctors from the capital of oil-producing Upper Nile State after their Malakal compound was looted.
21.01.2014  |  Juba
MSF’s Raphael Gorgeu (right) and Louisa Makering (left) in Juba, January 18.
MSF’s Raphael Gorgeu (right) and Louisa Makering (left) in Juba, January 18.

The MSF head Raphael Gorgeu said that armed men came into the compound last week and stole equipment, just days after MSF evacuated Bor and Bentiu following similar incidences.

Highly vulnerable people have just become even more vulnerable,” said Raphael Gorgeu, MSF’s head of mission in South Sudan. We don’t know what will happen to the thousands of displaced and wounded people across the country.”

We don’t care from what side the attackers were from, we are calling on both parties to respect our work.”
Raphael Gorgeu
We don’t care from what side the attackers were from, we are calling on both parties to respect our work,” he said.

Their retreat leaves thousands of civilians without health care at Malakal hospital. Since violence flared up on December 15, 2013, many South Sudanese civilians have been left without health services as international organisations, which provide an estimated 80 percent of basic infrastructure, scaled back their operations.

Since the fighting broke out in Malakal, doctors have been working on bullet wounds, cuts, and other severe wounds.

Now these people have no medication and we are worried,” said Louisa Makering, emergency coordinator for the organisation. We have been working on surgeries daily and since the conflict began, we have conducted 126 operations at the Malakal hospital alone.”

During the past three weeks, MSF medical teams have provided more than 20,000 consultations, treated 426 people with gunshot wounds and carried out 126 surgeries. MSF teams have also delivered more than 40 tons of medical and logistical supplies to its projects.

We have been working on surgeries daily and since the conflict began.”
Louisa Makering
MSF has been working in what is now South Sudan since 1983, and runs 16 projects in nine of the country’s ten states -- Agok, Aweil, Bentiu, Gogrial, Gumuruk, Leer, Maban, Malakal, Nasir, Yambio, Lankien, Yuai and Yida and has set up three additional emergency operations in Juba, Awerial and Malakal.  
 
Before the crisis, people in South Sudan had limited access to healthcare, with most pregnant women were unable to give birth in a medical facility, with limited treatment and vaccination options for large numbers of children, and with refugees receiving the bare minimum of assistance.

Red Cross President Peter Maurer told journalists at a press conference in Juba earlier this month that in the first three weeks of the year the international organisation had already spent a third of its annual funds -- and there were many more people in need of help.

The UN’s assistant secretary General for Human Rights Ivan Simonovic told journalists at a press conference in Juba last week that he had received reports of mass killings, extrajudicial killings, arbitrary detention, enforced disappearances, sexual violence, the wide spread destruction of property and the use of child soldiers.

Fighting began in South Sudan just over a month ago and escalated across many states, killing thousands, making hundreds of thousands homeless and sparking fears about the future of the nation which only became independent two and a half years ago.