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عربي

It’s time to confront global warming in Sudan, expert says

Mahir Abu Goukh
Increased rainfall in Sudan over the past decade can be directly pinned on global warming, according to Hasan Bashir.
3.09.2014  |  Khartoum
البروفيسور حسن بشير، 20 أغسطس.
البروفيسور حسن بشير، 20 أغسطس.

Solutions need to be organised soon to solve the impact of global warming, a trend highlighted in recent studies published by the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation(FAO), which revealed that Sudan is one of the countries most affected by climate change.

This climatic upheaval requires organised solutions, Economics Professor at the Nilein University, Hasan Bashir said. Infrastructure is needed to safeguard water supply. Ideally, storage reservoirs need to be build, to enable farmers to use water later as needed.

Solving issues like agricultural production and food security must be done methodically through a long-term strategic vision.”
Hasan Bashir
Agricultural and industrial productions needed to be fused, he argued, saying that the creation of agroindustrial complexes would add value, meaning that agricultural products are sold as processed products, earning several times as much money.

Solving issues like agricultural production and food security must be done methodically through a long-term strategic vision,” he explained, arguing for more public participation in the decision-making process.
 
The federal system experiment with its local governments and administrations has failed to involve local communities in the decision-making process related to development and even to their everyday lives,” Bashir said.

The use of millet and maize, traditionally used to produce kisra, a type pancake typically eaten in Sudan, has declined for many reasons including its cost and time intensity.

Expanding maize and millet production and making them available at fair prices will reduce growing dependency on wheat which is currently preferred even in small towns and villages.

But much more must be done to encourage people away from imported wheat, Bashir said: We need local wheat production through local or foreign investors.”  

He added that infrastructure and finance sources must be developed, including providing a suitable investment climate for foreign investors via agreements with countries like Egypt and Saudi Arabia.

These steps would preserve local resources, protect the environment, safeguard the livelihoods of local people and protect their rights to their land, he argued.

Cooperation between Sudan and South Sudan will boost resources and increase income levels in both countries.”
Hasan Bashir
Meanwhile, deeper cooperation between Sudan and South Sudan would improve precarious food provision in the neighbouring nations, especially if there are improvements to security and economic links. This would provide much needed infrastructure in border areas to encourage foreign investments.

He highlighted areas of cooperation already up and running, for example, maize grown in the north is a key to achieve food security in the south where maize is a main source of food for a large portion of the population.

This opens up a large market for Sudanese food manufacturers and could encourage expansion in areas such as meat packing/processing, dairy production and leather and wool production, he said. The north, on the other hand, needs the south for its oil and other products.”

Border areas between Sudan and South Sudan are rich in plant and animal resources and therefore could play an important role in achieving a reliable food supply for Sudan. Cooperation between Sudan and South Sudan will boost resources and increase income levels in both countries. This will consequently boost the revenue from food production and will modernise and diversify agriculture.”