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Fish & Ships
Fishing in Juba

Simon Bingo
A chat with two fishermen and their customer along the banks of the Nile in South Sudan’s capital Juba.
17.11.2016  |  Juba, South Sudan
Some of the most common fish in the Nile: 1. Bayad (Bagrus bajad); 2. Fahaka pufferfish (Tetraodon lineatus); 3. Electric catfish (Malapterurus electricus). (photo: The Niles | Illustrations by Mayu Nakai)
Some of the most common fish in the Nile: 1. Bayad (Bagrus bajad); 2. Fahaka pufferfish (Tetraodon lineatus); 3. Electric catfish (Malapterurus electricus). (photo: The Niles | Illustrations by Mayu Nakai)

South Sudan’s natural resources extend beyond its oil. The Nile has abundant fish, enabling some locals to feed their families or even earn a basic income. But despite the local fish stocks, South Sudan currently imports fish. Fishermen and their customer gathered on the banks of the Nile in Juba and discussed their trade.

Farsala Ismail, fisherman:
“You know what? The fish they bring in from abroad don’t taste of anything. Our fish tastes great. It is fresh and has no chemicals. Everybody loves it. Fishing is tricky. We depend on luck. If God blesses you and you catch two fish, you don’t eat it all. You eat like a rat, nibbling small pieces. You sell one fish to pay for your children’s school fees and you use the rest of your money to buy food. Sometimes, if it is a bad day, the boat will be idle and you and the children will not eat that day. That is our life here.”

Jackson Wani, a businessman who buys fish from the fishermen:
“Juba people like Juba fish because it is fresh. Look at this one, they have just caught it from the river now, I will take it alive to the market. Everything is fresh. The fish from outside South Sudan takes two, three, or even four days to arrive. It is not fresh. This fish here is still alive.”

Stephen Wani, fisherman:
“What we want from the government is support - timber and fishing nets. That would help us feed our families and supply Juba with fish. That is what we lack. If the government is listening to us, let them help us.” 

Fishing in #Juba: A chat with two fishermen and their customer along the banks of the #Nile in #SouthSudan’s capital...

Posted by theniles.org on Thursday, 17 November 2016




 

This article is part of:
Water: A fool won’t even find water in the Nile!
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